Dicamba Cutoff Date Approaching

Dicamba cutoff dates are nearing for both South Dakota and Minnesota, find each news release below for further information on the application restrictions.

Minnesota: Application cutoff date June 20th
South Dakota Application cutoff date June 30th

SOUTH DAKOTA DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NEWS RELEASE

For Immediate Release: June 17, 2019
Media Contact: Maggie Stensaas, 605.773.4073

Dicamba Cutoff Date Approaching

PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) reminds applicators that June 30 is the cutoff date for dicamba products.

The SDDA obtained Special Local Needs registration labels, also known as 24(c) labels, from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the following products: Engenia, Fexapan and Xtendimax with VaporGrip Technology. These labels establish a June 30 cutoff for applications of these products in South Dakota for the 2019 growing season. Applicators can use these products until soybeans reach the R1 growth stage, 45 days after planting or June 30, whichever comes first.

“While the weather has had an impact on planting this year, which I know is frustrating for many producers, the fact remains that warmer conditions in July increase the risk of volatility and drift when using dicamba products. The cutoff date is based on data which supports increased risk of drift after July 1,” says Secretary of Agriculture Kim Vanneman. “I encourage producers to explore the other products available to them once the cutoff date for use of dicamba has passed.”

Anyone applying Engenia, Fexapan or Xtendimax with VaporGrip Technology must also abide by the restrictions included in the EPA labels for those products, including recordkeeping requirements. Additionally, applicators applying or purchasing these products will have to complete annual dicamba specific training. Trainings can be found on the SDDA website at https://sdda.sd.gov/ag-services/dicamba/.

Agriculture is a major contributor to South Dakota’s economy, generating $25.6 billion in annual economic activity and employing over 115,000 South Dakotans. The South Dakota Department of Agriculture’s mission is to promote, protect and preserve South Dakota agriculture for today and tomorrow. Visit them online at sdda.sd.gov or find them on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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http://news.sd.gov/newsitem.aspx?id=25604


June 11, 2019

The Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA) is reminding pesticide applicators of the state-specific restriction for the use of the herbicide dicamba for the 2019 growing season. The product cannot be applied in Minnesota after June 20.

The 2019 Minnesota restriction is in addition to those established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The affected formulations are XtendiMax by Monsanto, Engenia by BASF, FeXapan by DuPont, and Tavium by Syngenta.

“We understand that late planting this season has caused concern for growers who want to use this crop management tool,” said Agriculture Commissioner Thom Petersen. “However, delaying applications in an attempt to control later emerging weeds can result in poor control and presents other risks. If you are one of the growers that has invested in dicamba technology, now is the time to use it because late planting combined with pre-plant tillage can offer advantages for weed control, according to University of Minnesota Extension.”

The June 20, 2019, cut-off date is based on the MDA’s ongoing investigations and informal surveys into reports of crop damage from alleged dicamba off-target movement over the past two growing seasons. In 2017, the MDA received 253 reports of alleged dicamba drift; 55 of those were formal complaints requesting investigations. Those reports impacted an estimated 265,000 acres. After state restrictions were put in place for the 2018 growing season, the number of complaints dropped dramatically to 53 reports, of which 29 were formal complaints. Just over 1,800 acres were impacted in 2018.

This year’s cut-off date was first announced on December 10, 2018. Over the winter, approximately 5,800 pesticide applicators attended trainings across the state as required by the product labels.

Dicamba is most effective early in the growing season. Product labels recommend application on small broadleaf weeds that are up to 4 inches tall.

To manage weeds after June 20, herbicides from Group 9 (Glyphosate), Group 2 (Pursuit, Classic, FirstRate), and Group 14 (Flexstar, Cobra, Cadet, Ultra Blazer) can be used. If you have herbicide resistant weeds such as waterhemp, follow University of Minnesota Extension recommendations on layering of residual herbicides such as Dual, Outlook, Warrant, and Valor.

In Minnesota, the XtendiMax, Engenia, FeXapan, and Tavium formulations of dicamba are “Restricted Use Pesticides” for retail sale to, and for use only by, certified applicators.

https://www.mda.state.mn.us/june-20-cut-date-remains-dicamba-use-minnesota

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Media Contact
Allen Sommerfeld, MDA Communications
651-201-6185
Allen.Sommerfeld@state.mn.us

Ready for Change

By Annette Bertelsen, from Spring 2019 C magazine

What happens when the world’s biggest buyer suddenly backs away from U.S. soybeans? That’s been a question on everyone’s mind since July 6, 2018, when the United States implemented China-specific tariffs. The move embroiled U.S. farmers and cooperatives in a trade war that hit the soybean world particularly hard. Spring USDA data shows 2018–2019 soybean export inspections down nearly 34 percent from the year before, with farms and cooperatives struggling to handle huge carryover and reduced cash flow.

(more…)

You are invited to the 2019 CHS Owners Forums

register for a 2019 owners forum

The 2019 CHS Owners Forums will be held at 11 sites across the country in May and June. As an owner of CHS, we invite you to join us at the forum nearest you to hear business updates from CHS leadership including CHS President and CEO Jay Debertin. We will also take a look at industry trends and will be asking for your input on how we can make connections that support long-term success. Forums will wrap up with lunch at noon. Please register to reserve your spot.

Local high school seniors awarded CHS scholarships

May 14, 2019 –Ten high school seniors from the local CHS trade area have been named recipients of $500 CHS scholarships.

“CHS is committed to making a long-lasting, measurable impact on rural America and the agricultural industry,” said Kent Mulder, general manager. “It’s an honor and our commitment to ensure we’re helping make an impact in the endeavors of our future ag leaders. We congratulate the recipients as they finish out their high school year and set their sights to make a great impact on the agricultural industry.”

The recipients of CHS scholarships include:

Jared Hauswedell, Tyler, MN – attending Lake Area Tech
Trevor Benson, Lyons, SD – attending South Dakota State University
Lincoln Burggraff, Colton, SD – attending South Dakota State University
Brooklyn Ludeman, Tracy, MN – attending South Dakota State University
Cayden Buysse, Tracy, MN – attending South Dakota State University
Brooklyn Knudson, Canton, SD – attending Lake Area Tech
William Stegenga, Luverne, MN – attending Lake Area Tech
Cooper Hansen, Tyler, MN – attending Bethany Lutheran College
Aaron Goodale, Chester, SD – attending South Dakota State University
Allyson Beninga, Inwood, IA – attending Iowa State University

CHS was impressed with the outstanding scholarship applications received in the first year of this program. In order to be eligible for a CHS scholarship, applicants must be pursuing a career in agriculture and live within the CHS trade territory.

Check for underground utilities before digging

Whether your spring to-do list includes building a fence or planting trees – breaking ground should always be done with caution. April is National Safe Digging Month so remember, your best line of defense before digging is to call 811, a free service that marks underground utilities and pipelines. Many of these are less than a foot underground. 

The process is simple: Call 811 or visit clickbeforeyoudig.com three days before a digging project, wait for underground utilities to be marked and don’t dig within two feet of those markers.  

digging

It’s best to call 811 any time you break ground, even if you think you know where a utility line is located. “In the U.S., an underground utility is hit every nine minutes, causing dangerous consequences,” says Tina Beach, public awareness specialist for CHS. “It takes a lifetime to build a farm, and it takes just one free call to keep it safe.”  

3 equipment tips to get the most out of a short planting season

Planting Equipment Tips

By Mimi Falkman, senior marketing specialist, CHS Lubricants

Planting season is always a busy time of year on the farm, but it can be especially tight when winter overstays its welcome. A short spring means there’s even less time than usual for farmers to complete some of the most important work of the year.

During a condensed planting season, equipment is under added stress because it needs to work overtime to meet demands. To keep machines protected and operating at peak performance during a shorter spring, farmers can set themselves up for success by preparing their equipment and fluids while the fields are still wet.

(more…)

Area producers share in local CHS patronage distribution


For further information, contact:

Kent Mulder
605-582-2415
kent.mulder@chsinc.com
or
Lisa Graham-Peterson
651-355-4523
lisa.graham@chsinc.com

BRANDON, SOUTH DAKOTA, April 15, 2019 – Eligible farmer-owners of the CHS retail business based out of Brandon, South Dakota, shared in the recent distribution of cash patronage and equity based on business done with the co-op.

“We’re extremely proud to share this important cooperative membership benefit with our customers,” said Kent Mulder, general manager. “Delivering an economic return to them on the business they do with CHS is one more way we help our owners grow.”

This locally based retail division of CHS Inc. allocated a total of $7,608,217.06 in patronage dividends to its eligible members based on business done Sept. 1, 2017 – Aug. 31, 2018, of which $1,344,372.01 is being paid out in cash.

Overall, CHS Inc. will return $150 million in cash patronage and equity redemption to its farmer-owners in 2019, part of the cooperative’s commitment to sharing profits with our owners and returning money to rural America where it can be reinvested in the community. More than 840 local cooperatives and 25,000 farmers share in this distribution of cash patronage and equity redemptions.

The percentage returned to owners is determined annually by the CHS Board of Directors and based on performance, financial strength and long-term growth opportunities.

“Returning cash to our owners enables farmers, ranchers and cooperatives to invest in their own futures,” said Dan Schurr, chairman of the CHS Board.

In the past 12 years, CHS has returned about $3.6 billion to its owners in the form of cash patronage.

The Brandon-based retail business delivers agronomy, energy, feed and grain products and services to South Dakota, Minnesota and Nebraska ag producers and other customers from 22 locations. It is part of CHS Inc., a leading global agribusiness owned by farmers, ranchers and cooperatives across the United States. Diversified in energy, agronomy, grains and foods, CHS is committed to helping its customers, farmer-owners and other stakeholders grow their businesses through its domestic and global operations. CHS supplies energy, crop nutrients, grain marketing services, animal feed, food and food ingredients along with financial and risk management services. The company operates petroleum refineries/pipelines and manufactures, markets and distributes Cenex® brand refined fuels, lubricants, propane and renewable energy products.

This document and other CHS Inc. publicly available documents contain, and CHS officers and representatives may from time to time make, “forward–looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Report Act of 1995. Forward–looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. Forward–looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on CHS current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of its businesses, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward–looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of CHS control. CHS actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward–looking statements. Therefore, you should not rely on any of these forward–looking statements. Important factors that could cause CHS actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward–looking statements are discussed or identified in CHS public filings made with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including in the “Risk Factors” discussion in Item 1A of CHS Annual Report on Form 10–K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2018. Any forward–looking statements made by CHS in this document are based only on information currently available to CHS and speak only as of the date on which the statement is made. CHS undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward–looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

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CHS reports $596.3 million of net income for first six months of fiscal 2019

CHS Income

CHS Inc. reported net income of $248.8 million for the second quarter of fiscal 2019 and $596.3 million for the first six months of fiscal 2019.

“Our strong performance in the second quarter reflects our hard work at serving our owners and other customers better. We’ve refocused on serving our customers and improving our operations, and that has shown positive results in our financials for the first half of fiscal 2019,” said Jay Debertin, CHS president and chief executive officer. “Our performance also reflects the benefit of a diverse platform across business units that serves our cooperative and farmer-owners.”

(more…)

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